krystal-cage:

"I have to die in this place."
    Homura's Witch Form

thatdarnmo:

Trash Prince 2/4

so angry. so fashionable. i could cry.

staticwind:

image

soltreis:

I left my wounds raw and empty
I let you fill them

floresydragones:

tried to draw cynthia again

silentpea:

konnichiwa yasasiku (by jenth)

actualubisoft:

I’m so glad this man is guarding our galaxy

chicagopubliclibrary:

Brain Function ‘Boosted For Days’ After Reading A Novel

From The Independent:

Reading a gripping novel causes biological changes in the brain which last for days as the mind is transported into the body of the protagonist.

Being pulled into the world of a gripping novel can trigger actual, measurable changes in the brain that linger for at least five days after reading, scientists have said.

The new research, carried out at Emory University in the US, found that reading a good book may cause heightened connectivity in the brain and neurological changes that persist in a similar way to muscle memory.

The changes were registered in the left temporal cortex, an area of the brain associated with receptivity for language, as well as the the primary sensory motor region of the brain.

Neurons of this region have been associated with tricking the mind into thinking it is doing something it is not, a phenomenon known as grounded cognition - for example, just thinking about running, can activate the neurons associated with the physical act of running.

“The neural changes that we found associated with physical sensation and movement systems suggest that reading a novel can transport you into the body of the protagonist,” said neuroscientist Professor Gregory Berns, lead author of the study.

“We already knew that good stories can put you in someone else’s shoes in a figurative sense. Now we’re seeing that something may also be happening biologically.”

Click here to read the rest of the story.

Do not mock a pain that you haven’t endured.
—Unknown

thefashionbubble:

John Rocha Fall/Winter 2014 Details, LFW.

jamesdeenhateclub:

i think it’s important that myself and other white ppl remember that we can not even begin to truly understand the pain and trauma of what is happening in ferguson, nor can we grasp the anger and sadness black communities experience due to this situation. all we can do is stand in solidarity, listen, and not derail or take the focus away from the true face of racism and white supremacy.

scratchingpad:

Kittens post naptime

“Do what you love” disguises the fact that being able to choose a career primarily for personal reward is a privilege, a sign of socioeconomic class. Even if a self-employed graphic designer had parents who could pay for art school and co-sign a lease for a slick Brooklyn apartment, she can bestow DWYL as career advice upon those covetous of her success.

If we believe that working as a Silicon Valley entrepreneur or a museum publicist or a think-tank acolyte is essential to being true to ourselves, what do we believe about the inner lives and hopes of those who clean hotel rooms and stock shelves at big-box stores? The answer is: nothing.


Do what you love, love what you do: An omnipresent mantra that’s bad for work and workers.

a couple of other quotes from the article i really like:

According to this way of thinking, labor is not something one does for compensation but is an act of love. If profit doesn’t happen to follow, presumably it is because the worker’s passion and determination were insufficient. Its real achievement is making workers believe their labor serves the self and not the marketplace

and

Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life! Before succumbing to the intoxicating warmth of that promise, it’s critical to ask, “Who, exactly, benefits from making work feel like nonwork?” “Why should workers feel as if they aren’t working when they are?” In masking the very exploitative mechanisms of labor that it fuels, DWYL is, in fact, the most perfect ideological tool of capitalism. If we acknowledged all of our work as work, we could set appropriate limits for it, demanding fair compensation and humane schedules that allow for family and leisure time.