jamesdeenhateclub:

i think it’s important that myself and other white ppl remember that we can not even begin to truly understand the pain and trauma of what is happening in ferguson, nor can we grasp the anger and sadness black communities experience due to this situation. all we can do is stand in solidarity, listen, and not derail or take the focus away from the true face of racism and white supremacy.

scratchingpad:

Kittens post naptime

“Do what you love” disguises the fact that being able to choose a career primarily for personal reward is a privilege, a sign of socioeconomic class. Even if a self-employed graphic designer had parents who could pay for art school and co-sign a lease for a slick Brooklyn apartment, she can bestow DWYL as career advice upon those covetous of her success.

If we believe that working as a Silicon Valley entrepreneur or a museum publicist or a think-tank acolyte is essential to being true to ourselves, what do we believe about the inner lives and hopes of those who clean hotel rooms and stock shelves at big-box stores? The answer is: nothing.


Do what you love, love what you do: An omnipresent mantra that’s bad for work and workers.

a couple of other quotes from the article i really like:

According to this way of thinking, labor is not something one does for compensation but is an act of love. If profit doesn’t happen to follow, presumably it is because the worker’s passion and determination were insufficient. Its real achievement is making workers believe their labor serves the self and not the marketplace

and

Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life! Before succumbing to the intoxicating warmth of that promise, it’s critical to ask, “Who, exactly, benefits from making work feel like nonwork?” “Why should workers feel as if they aren’t working when they are?” In masking the very exploitative mechanisms of labor that it fuels, DWYL is, in fact, the most perfect ideological tool of capitalism. If we acknowledged all of our work as work, we could set appropriate limits for it, demanding fair compensation and humane schedules that allow for family and leisure time.

Girl on the Ball (Detail), Pablo Picasso (1905) 

  • baby:d-d-d-d
  • dad:daddy? are you trying to say daddy?
  • baby:d-d-don't you think this meme format is more than a little played out. I am tired of the way that tumblr does not seem to know when to leave well enough alone when it comes to humor online. The more and more I've had to see posts like this the less and less funny they become. And it does not just go for this "baby saying it's first word" post format. I honestly came out to have a good time, spiders georg, and the mere concept of skeletons have all recently been subject to tumblr's strange obsession with rapid desensitization to a meme. The law of diminishing returns practically states that with every new variation on a meme, every time you add something to the already successful formula, it will be less successful, maybe not in note amount, but in post quality. And if we are living in a world where you value your note count more than you value the service you are providing to other bloggers with your insight or jokes, then you are practically a capitalist and is that really what you want? Tumblr, are you really in support of meme capitalism or can we, as a website, try to come together and create something more, something bigger? We can usher in a meme utopia. It is within our grasp. Thank you.
  • pimptier:

    who the fuck do i even have added on skypeimage?????????????????????????????????????????

    KATANA……….. BARA APPRECIATOR EXTRAORDINAIRE…